How can refugees be helped on their journeys?

Posted by Earthr.org Content Team on 20 Aug, 2018

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4 Solutions

Refugees Open Ware - Teaching refugees to turn waste material into tools

Posted by Arabinda Mhasalkar on 01 Oct, 2018

Refugees Open Ware catalyzes impact investment, philanthropic capital, and public sector contributions for projects and companies aligned with our theory of change. To do so, we often invest our own capital, being the first money in.

They prepare financial models and pitch decks, conduct due diligence, and offer strategic advisory. They also provide talent, mentorship, and access to their networks, incubating entrepreneurial solutions from idea to scale.

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Better Shelter - Ikea's flatpack refugee shelter

Posted by Arabinda Mhasalkar on 25 Sep, 2018

Ikea has come up with a robust 17.5 sq m shelter that fits inside two boxes and can be assembled by four people in just four hours, following the familiar picture-based instructions – substituting the ubiquitous allen key for a hammer, with no extra tools necessary. Ikea’s solar-powered Better Shelter lasts six times longer than a typical emergency tent.

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Solar powered water pump

Posted by Neelima Chaudhary on 25 Sep, 2018

An innovative solution providing sustainable water supply for 2,50,000 Congolese and Burundian refugees living in three camps in Western Tanzania. It is built in close coordination with the government of Tanzania and the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR). Water Mission will lead the engineering side of the project.

Making this work possible, the Poul Due Jensen Foundation, owner of Grundfos, the Denmark-based global leader in pump technology, has committed $5.3 million over the next three years.

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Solar power stations that allow refugees to charge their phones

Posted by Earthr.org Content Team on 20 Aug, 2018

Smartphones are an essential lifeline for refugees, granting access to maps and information that aid in their journeys. Mobile devices also house messaging applications, allowing refugees to connect with families back home without high charges.

These features are crucial, but charging phones in overcrowded camps, where electricity is scarce, can be difficult.

That's why a team of students from Edinburgh University developed sun-powered charging stations for mobile phones, allowing refugees to power-up their devices. The students have installed two units in refugee camps in Greece, with each unit able to fully charge up to 240 devices each day.

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