How can wasteland be converted into productive land?

Posted by Samar Rizvi on 21 Jun, 2018

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4 Solutions

World's largest waste-to-energy plant proposed for Shenzhen, China

Posted by Earthr.org Content Team on 25 Aug, 2018

Proposed for the mountainous region on the outskirts of Shenzen, the waste-to-energy plant is expected to incinerate 5,000 tonnes of rubbish per day – approximately one third of the waste generated by the city's 20 million inhabitants each year. The huge circular building will boast a 66,000-square-metre roof, two thirds of which will be covered with photovoltaic panels, allowing the building to generate its own sustainable supply of energy.

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Istanbul - Circular Design Approach for Processing Waste

Posted by Earthr.org Content Team on 25 Aug, 2018

Istanbul's circular design approach to waste management allows the city to produce electricity and compost from different waste streams, as well as divert excess heat to greenhouses for greater productivity.

Istanbul's Odayeri waste management site is not only large, varied, and capable of processing 12,000 tons of waste per day, but also has a strong focus on environmental protection and tapping the potential resources for new growth. The 266-hectare site is dedicated to many different waste streams including municipal, medical, and organic waste. Landfill sites are isolated from groundwater using natural and geotechnical membranes, and drainage lines exist to collect methane gas produced over time. There is also a waste-to-energy plant with a capacity of 35 MW, enough to power 130,000 families for a year, which also produces heat as a by-product. Rather than let this go to waste, the heat is captured and sent to a nearby 3,200 m2 greenhouse for increased productivity. The organic waste processing area also produces compost for the greenhouse, which grows 600,000 flowers per month for the city's parks and gardens.

Istanbul faces a serious air pollution challenge, with particulate levels consistently above the WHO recommended level. Smart designs for heating and cooling that do not create extra pollution such as the greenhouse project are needed to reduce health risks for citizens.

Environmental Benefits – Seasonal flowers in Turkey are usually grown in Mediterranean climates. Using excess heat to grow the flowers locally results in logistical and cost savings.

Economic Benefits – By using waste heat from the waste processing site instead of burning natural gas, the greenhouse saves an estimated $130,000 per year.

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Afforest - Growing forests on overlooked lands

Posted by Earthr.org Content Team on 23 Aug, 2018

Shubhendu Sharma was working as a young industrial engineer at Toyota when he got his big idea: to set up a company that brings back wild, native forests on overlooked parcels of land. By the time Sharma was 25, he had already laid the foundations for his business. Seven years later, his company Afforestt is now working in India and around the world to grow native forests in city centres, outside homes and factories, and at airports and rail stations.

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Groasis: Fighting Desertification with Reforestation

Posted by Justin Kuhlmann on 21 Jun, 2018

Groasis Ecological Water Saving Technology allows helps change wasteland into productive land while creating capital growth. It is an integrated planting technology to plant in dry, eroded, desert and rocky areas. During the first year while planting with it, water savings are more than 90% when compared to any other planting method. From the second year onwards, no water is added and irrigation is not needed. The water savings are from then 100%.

In most locations ground water can be found at a depth of 3 or more meters. The problem for a plant in dry and eroded areas is that the first 3 meters of top soil are dry. The air temperature is also high and frequently there are strong winds. After planting in these dry areas, the plant often has not got enough time to extend its roots deep enough to find the groundwater. The plant subsequently dries out and dies. The Groasis Technology helps the plant to grow its roots 3 or more meters deep in the first year. Once the plant reaches this depth, it is able to grow independently and will not die anymore. After that year, the Groasis Waterboxx® plant cocoon can be removed and the next tree can be planted with it.

The Groasis Ecological Water Saving Technology can be used to plant orchards, plant productive forests, for ecosystem recovery, greening up cities or anywhere where planting without irrigation is impossible, or too expensive.

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