How can we reduce the amount of waste in our cities?

Posted by Vivek Mehta on 29 May, 2018

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6 Solutions

RUBBLOX - Furniture from recycled rubber

Posted by Earthr.org Content Team on 25 Aug, 2018

RUBBLOX, a furniture line created by Dwayne Bass, is made of recycled rubber in the great state of Georgia. Rubber that is no longer suitable for use, have all the fibers, steel belts, and impurities removed to use the finest and cleanest shredded rubber.  The rubber is then dyed using organically mined dyes, which are non-toxic for children, pets and our environment.  The rubber is then shaped and molded into cubes, cylinders and many other shapes to meet all design needs.

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Landscaping a garden bed from printer cartridges

Posted by Earthr.org Content Team on 25 Aug, 2018

eWood Gardens is a functional and sustainable replacement material for timber, concrete, brick and steel which can be used for garden beds, flooring and more. A single tiered eWood raised garden bed contains approximately 100 recycled printer cartridges.

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Sanitary pads out of cloth waste - Arunachalam Muruganantham (Padman)

Posted by Earthr.org Content Team on 25 Aug, 2018

Arunachalam Muruganantham used vast quantities of underutilised or waste cloth from urban homes as a resource to cater to the clothing and other basic needs of the rural and poor community. This story also inspired a Bollywood movie, Padman.

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Benchtop Food Recycler

Posted by Earthr.org Content Team on 24 Aug, 2018

Turn kitchen waste into a beautiful garden with the benchtop food recycler. Landfill receives tonnes of food waste each year. While traditional composting methods help to fix this, they can be very slow. This food cycler can take kitchen scraps and turn it into a useful product in 3-6 hours. It also reduces the scraps by 90% volume. You can then spread this in your garden to help your plants grow strong. The food recycler  is stylish looking and seals, making it a comfortable addition to any kitchen countertop without the site or smell of a traditional compost.

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GloryBrew Compostable Coffee Pods

Posted by Earthr.org Content Team on 24 Aug, 2018

Brew up a productive day with these compostable coffee pods. The best thing about pod coffee machines was the convenience they provided. It became super easy to make a coffee at home in a reusable coffee cup before heading out, but the problem with them is that the leftover pods are hard to get rid of and are as much trouble for the environment. So the solution is to make the pods as environmentally friendly as possible. GloryBrew's response was to make coffee pods that are entirely made from compostable materials. So the pods can become usable soil in just a few weeks - good for the planet and your coffee cup.

  • The GloryBrew pods are Rainforest Alliance Certified
  • Compatible with Keurig K-Cup Machines
  • 100% Compostable pods made from renewable materials and coffee chaff
  • 3 different coffee blends available
  • The coffee comes from environmentally friendly sources

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Repair Café: Fixing things instead of tossing them away

Posted by Stuti Parekh on 29 May, 2018

We throw away vast amounts of stuff, even things with almost nothing wrong, and which could get a new lease on life after a simple repair. Lots of people have forgotten that they can repair things themselves or they no longer know how. Society doesn’t always show much appreciation for the people who still have this practical knowledge, and against their will they are often left standing on the sidelines.

Repair Cafés are free meeting places and they’re all about repairing things (together). In the place where a Repair Café is located, people find tools and materials to help them make any repairs you need. Visitors bring their broken items from home. Together with the specialists they start making their repairs in the Repair Café. It’s an ongoing learning process. If they have nothing to repair, they can enjoy a cup of tea or coffee. Or they can lend a hand with someone else’s repair job. They can also get inspired at the reading table – by leafing through books on repairs and Do-It-Yourself (DIY).

Through the Repair Café, people who might otherwise be sidelined are getting involved again. Valuable practical knowledge is getting passed on. Things are being used for longer and don’t have to be thrown away. This reduces the volume of raw materials and energy needed to make new products. It cuts CO2 emissions, for example, because manufacturing new products and recycling old ones contributes to CO2 emissions.

Taken from https://repaircafe.org/en/about/

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