What are some sustainable housing solutions for homeless/displaced populations?

Posted by Kunal Nandwani on 29 May, 2018

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Sustainable tent that collects rainwater, folds up for easy transport and stores solar energy

Posted by Earthr.org Content Team on 21 Aug, 2018

This is the invention of Jordanian-Canadian architect, designer and artist Abeer Seikaly. These amazing multipurpose tents were designed with refugees in mind, people who have been displaced by global and civil war, climate change and more. Inspired by elements of nature such as snake skin and traditional cultural aspects such as weaving, nomadic life and tent dwellings, this weather proof, strong but lightweight and mobile fabric tent gives refugees shelter but also a chance to "weave their lives back together".

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POD: Homeless yet home

Posted by Vivek Mehta on 29 May, 2018

POD is a modular, medium-term housing solution for displaced populations that can be deployed quickly to locations throughout the world. Once delivered, the pre-assembled PODs are easily erected by the inhabitants. Fellow inhabitants, working together to erect their PODs, will help foster a sense of community during these often precarious times.

Designed as a series of telescoping square frames, the POD is capable of accommodating a larger area for congregating and a smaller area for sleeping. Inhabitants are protected from the elements by a durable fabric skin which is integrated with the structural metal frame. In order to increase the adaptability and durability of the POD module, structural support footings are utilized to lift the POD off of the ground, minimizing the physical impact on the site while providing greater stability and security in various locations.

The assembled POD modules can then be connected and arranged in different formations creating new communities of a more familiar urbanism for the inhabitants - imparting the individuals with a sense of humanity and dignity that is often treated as an afterthought when dealing with those in displacement crises.

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