What are some ways to reduce food wastage?

Posted by Arunima Kumar on 29 May, 2018

Share
Drop Image File (.jpg, .png, .jpeg)
Cancel

13 Solutions

Zéro Gâchis - Connecting consumers with discounts to reduce food waste

Posted by Earthr.org Content Team on 25 Aug, 2018

Zéro Gâchis aims to provide a platform for businesses to let consumers know in real-time when they have food reaching expiration, which customers can then purchase at discounted prices. The app also uses geo-location capabilities on customers’ smartphones to target the discounts towards those shoppers who are already in the area. What’s more, buyers will be able to gain points on the site each time they take advantage of discounts, which can be converted into cash directed towards food waste charities such as Restos du Coeur or Banque Alimentaire.

Originally posted on https://www.springwise.com/top-10-eco-sustainability-idea-12-months/

Source

Share

OzHarvest - Food Rescue

Posted by Earthr.org Content Team on 22 Aug, 2018

OzHarvest is Australia’s leading food rescue organisation, collecting quality excess food from commercial outlets and delivering it directly to more than 1000 charities supporting people in need across the country.

OzHarvest has four pillars: Rescue Food, Educate Communities, Engage Communities, Innovate Solutions to combat food waste.

Source

Owl Image
Share

SecondBite - Healthy Food on Empty Plates

Posted by Earthr.org Content Team on 22 Aug, 2018

SecondBite exists to provide access to fresh, nutritious food for people in need across Australia. They rescue edible, fresh, nutritious food that is heading for landfill and give it to people in need, free of charge. As of this writing, they've provided 100,000,000+ meals worth 50,000,000+ kilograms nationally.

Source

Share

Y Waste - An app that connects you with Cheap Eats to tackle food waste

Posted by Earthr.org Content Team on 22 Aug, 2018

You can help fight food waste and save money on grub simultaneously, thanks to an app called Y Waste.It helps you locate businesses in your area that have surplus food to offload at the end of the day. You can then purchase it at a discounted price, paying via your smartphone and picking it up from the venue at the allocated time. Depending on which city you're searching in, you might find sandwiches and salads from the local cafe, unsold pastries from that nearby bakery, or even freshly made pizzas, all going cheap. The only restriction is that you have to take what's left.

Source

Share

The People's Fridge - Community fridge to reduce food waste

Posted by Dharmesh Mehta on 17 Jul, 2018

A community fridge has been installed in south London to ensure that unwanted food goes to people who might need it.

A crowd-funding campaign raised more than £2,000 to pay for The People's Fridge in Brixton, which allows small traders and members of the public to donate any food they have leftover. Then they sign a book to confirm what they are giving away.

There are a few rules for the fridge: it does not accept raw meat, raw fish or opened milk, and only registered food traders can donate produce that is prepared or cooked.

Source

Share

Cobuy: Group buying software that helps people buy good food at good prices, together

Posted by Eli Martinez on 25 Jun, 2018

Cobuy is an app that makes buying groups/co-ops easy to start, maintain, and grow. Using the collective buying power of a group, people can buy food in bulk directly from wholesalers. By cutting out retailers, retail food waste is eliminated, saving money and providing access to a wider range of better quality products.

Food and food waste are such a central part of the way we live. Purchasing better food together for less is the central activity of a buying group, it becomes a cornerstone of the group and allows for other activities to start occurring around it. Developing friendships, local trade, sharing food abundance (before it becomes waste), networking , creating group agency within the local society and more. These less tangible and measurable benefits are what having community is. 

Buying food as a group, directly from suppliers, means that  the food waste that normally occurs from retailers is virtually eliminated. Co-ops have no need to over-purchase for convenience like supermarkets do, and goods are usually collected within a day or two after arriving from suppliers.

Helping Co-ops coordinate means creating a new market group of coordinated buying power. This will cause the supply chain to self adjust to meet this new opinionated and coordinated distributed demand.

Cobuy targets one part of the supply chain story, but successful co-ops have effects at other stages too. Making co-ops easy to operate allows small, local suppliers access to markets they are currently shut out of. 

Source

Share

Food Flow: Reduce Food Waste, Gain Food Experiences

Posted by Theresa Brooks on 25 Jun, 2018

Getting food to people before it goes waste. That is the simplest way to reduce food waste. The problem with catering companies, or anyone with a potential surplus of food, is that there is a cost involved in transporting the excess food where it is needed. Companies and governments sometimes offer tributary benefits to incentivize food-producing entities to get their unused surplus to shelters before it goes to waste. What if you involved the community, local commerce and individuals alike, in recognizing this is a big problem that requires all hands on deck? The proposal is that anyone with a means of transportation can help transport excess food from a restaurant or catering company to a food shelter. People that do this will receive Flow points that they can redeem for food experiences. At scale, dispatching algorithms popularized by players in the on-demand economy space can be used to make it as seamless as possible to all parties involved.

Source

Share

Re-Plate: Re-plating Surplus Meals

Posted by Siddhant Bhandari on 23 Jun, 2018

Re-Plate is a nonprofit tech company that matches surplus high-quality meals with communities in need instantly.

Since their launch in January 2016, they have recovered over 120,000 pounds of food for charitable organizations throughout the Bay Area with their unique on-demand transportation system. Their novel approach is economically sustainable: they give their meals free to charitable organizations, and earn an average of $0.40 per meal from their donor-clients. 

Their system can be replicated in any city that has a high supply of and demand for surplus food. For many of their clients who sometimes spend almost $1 per meal on cleanup costs, their services provide a solution to their waste problem that is even more economically viable than not participating in food recovery. 

To close the gap between food waste and food insecurity, they have created an online marketplace for individuals and organizations to "Re-Plate" their excess meals based on their need and location. The Re-Plate Marketplace is a revolutionary web and mobile app that connects individual food donors to individual recipients in real time. A donor can simply post any food on the marketplace and a recipients can claim food based on their need and location, then arrange a time and place to pick it up. The Re-Plate Marketplace will provide everyone with the means to donate their food to whomever they choose, and it will bring awareness to the issues of food waste and food insecurity.

Source

Share

Xpire.org: Food Expiration Dates 2.0

Posted by Vivek Mehta on 23 Jun, 2018

Expired products represents a major source of food waste. In response to OpenIdeo's challenge on 'food waste', one idea was about using two dates, a 'soft, best-before date and a 'hard', consume-by (also called donate-by date), which would enable customers in making informed decisions thereby reducing waste. The soft date date is termed as buffer date.

These dates should be accessible and visible to both retailers and end consumers. The plan would also involve developing an ecosystem that allows consumers and retail stores to donate the food products once the soft date is crossed.

Expiration dates have fuzzy intent. In some cases expiration dates represent a "best-before" date, where the food is safe for consumption beyond the particular date, but may not provide the ideal level of taste or flavor. In other cases, expiration dates represent a "use-by" or "consume-by" date, where the food is possibly unfit for consumption beyond the specified date. By resolving this ambiguity, for instance by providing dual dates, both a soft date and a hard date, we can reduce wastage.

Concepts:

  1. Dual expiration dates: The first, and simplest form of implementation would involve having dual dates on every perishable food product - a soft, "best-before" date and a hard "use-buy" date. These dates may be several days, or even several months apart, depending on the food category. This itself can lead to significant reduction in waste.
  2. Donation: Beyond this, developing an ecosystem to enable consumers to donate products beyond the soft date could be considered.
  3. Technology: Third, using technology to improve the above models - for instance,  to help consumers identify soon to be expired products or share products with others could be thought of.

Source

Share

Toast Ale: delicious craft beer, brewed from surplus bread

Posted by Eli Martinez on 23 Jun, 2018

Up to 44% of bakery products go to waste, with over 15 million tonnes of bread thrown away per year in the UK alone. Half of that waste is created before it even reaches the end consumer.  

Toast Ale's mission is to collect the surplus fresh bread from bakeries, delis and sandwich factories, and brew it into delicious craft beer. The bread replaces one third of the malt barley required in the brewing process, and 100% of profits are poured back into fixing our broken food system.

Toast Ale launched out of Hackney, London in January 2016 and have already rescued over one tonne of bread from being wasted. Their beer is also bringing the food waste message to new audiences, highlighting how simple and delicious the solutions can be. They have already expanded to Yorkshire and Bristol in the UK, and have had partnership requests from brewers and change-makers internationally, from Denver, Pittsburgh and LA to Austria and Iceland.

Source

Share

BIOVESSEL: An ecosystem powered by food waste

Posted by Samar Rizvi on 22 Jun, 2018

BIOVESSEL is an indoor ecosystem that is inspired by nature and designed to deal with your waste. It brings nature into your urban home and redefines your waste by turning it into nutrients that feed new life. It has been created to change how food waste in urban kitchens and homes is dealt with, making composting easy and achievable in every household. 

In the natural environment, soil, earthworms, water, and light work together to decompose organic matter gradually over time.  The earthworms are a vital part of this ecosystem as they consume and break down organic matter into smaller pieces and are also responsible for mixing soil layers, allowing the nutrients to be dispersed through the soil and becoming available to bacteria and fungi, which aid to accelerate decomposition. 

With the help of earthworms, soil and its  microorganisms, and water the ecosystem within BIOVESSEL redefines waste, which is  otherwise disposed of in bins. The process of breaking down the organic waste is purely  powered by nature and creates a self-sustainable ecosystem that achieves odorless, high  efficiency decomposition. Depending on the type of food waste, the BIOVESSEL  ecosystem is able to break down up to 500g-1kg per week.

BIOVESSEL has been created from the data collected and compiled from 20+ months of biological research, experiments, and observation on the process of food waste decomposition. The information documented from these observations and experiments were then translated into quantitative data. By putting the data into a specially developed algorithm, BIOVESSEL was born based on parametrics, ergonomics, etc. Being defined and designed by nature, the ecosystem that it creates is most suitable for its inhabitants and is one that is most effective and most convenient for its users.

Source

Share

Copia: Save money, reduce waste and feed communities in need

Posted by Kunal Nandwani on 29 May, 2018

Anyone can sell excess food on Copia. Copia makes food more accessible to people by redistributing surplus food to feed people in need. By reducing food waste, they save money and resources, minimize environmental impacts, and most importantly, move towards a world where everyone has enough to eat.

Request: Schedule pick-ups of your surplus food.
Recover: Rely on Copia’s Food Heroes (certified food handlers) to recover your surplus food and safely deliver it to local non-profits in need.
Report: You can track surplus trends, make better buying decisions, and access tax deductions, as well as receive photos and testimonials from the people you fed!

They charge a volume-based fee, similar to composting, but instead of feeding worms, they feed people.

They also get customers the money they would have otherwise left on the table, or worse...in the trash.

One can also become a driver with them, therefore they are generating employment too.

Source

Owl Image
Owl Image
Share

Hungry Harvest: Rescue for Ugly Produce

Posted by Kunal Nandwani on 29 May, 2018

The impact of wasted food extends beyond our bellies. Almost a quarter of agricultural water is used to grow food that’s not eaten. We generate the equivalent greenhouse gas emissions of 1 in 7 cars by growing, shipping & processing uneaten food. Cutting food waste in half globally could reduce our ecological footprint & ensure a more sustainable future.

That's why Hungry Harvest works every day to rescue this fresh & delicious produce whose only crime is being a little off-size, off-colour, a little ugly or a little overproduced. Packing this into their weekly variety boxes & delivering it to your doorstep not only helps eliminate unnecessary & avoidable food waste, but it also supports efforts to eradicate hunger in this country.

Every harvest delivered closes gaps in food access by supporting the reduced-cost Produce in Markets & donations to local hunger-solving organizations. They also take online orders and deliver food for 20% less than the grocery prices. The customizable boxes come in a variety of sizes & options so you can find the harvest that's just right for you!

Source

Owl Image
Owl Image
Share