What are some ways to tackle ocean garbage?

Posted by Arunima Kumar on 29 May, 2018

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13 Solutions

Trash Interceptor

Posted by Earthr.org Content Team on 23 Aug, 2018

The Trash Interceptor aims to give our cities’ maintenance crews a break by making it a cinch to clean all that gunk out of our drainage systems. Loads of garbage often accumulates in urban sewer systems and cleaning staff need to open the fences to clear away the garbage, which is both difficult and time-consuming.

The Trash Interceptor offers a clean and fast way of cleaning. In just one single step workers can collect the garbage in the sewer. The container is mounted below the sewer cleaning hole and features an outside support structure. The inner collection basket is suspended in the water and collects garbage and sediment. When the basket is full, the cleaning staff can simply lift the handle with one hand, spin the reels to close the basket and dispose of the garbage.

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Planters that trap and remove rubbish

Posted by Earthr.org Content Team on 22 Aug, 2018

Melbourne's Yarra River was a dumping ground for industrial run-off and is also attributed to the litter that finds its way into the river. To help remedy this rubbish that's affecting the health and quality of that Yarra's water, local industrial designer Rowan Turnham has developed a floating device to help trap and remove litter from the waterway.

In collaboration with non-profit vegetation renewal group the Yarra Link Project, Turnham (through his company Amass Design) has developed Project Galada. Galada is a modular capture barrier that floats on the surface of the water to capture and collect litter that accumulates there. Designed to look like bike chains, the pods link together to create a barrier suitable for the environment. As the Yarra flows  both ways, so the flap is opened by downstream flow (letting in litter), while an upstream flow pushes the flap closed (trapping litter).

The blue pods also act as buoyant planters, with roots that are submerged into the water to provide bio-filtration for the river. As well as removing cheeseburger wrappers from the Yarra, Project Galada will also help improve the health, biodiversity and quality of Melbourne's waterways both now and for the future. We still wouldn't swim in it, but still.

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A Vodka company is turning yesterday's cocktails into today's Hand Soap

Posted by Earthr.org Content Team on 21 Aug, 2018

When you're sitting at a bar, sipping a cocktail and enjoying its delicious flavours, you're usually just thinking about how great it tastes. Something you're probably not pondering is what happens to the fruit that makes your beverage so zesty. Once you're done drinking, what's next for those slices of lemon, wedges of orange and other edible cocktail ingredients and garnishes?

New Zealand-based vodka company 42BELOW can not only answer that question, but they're helping make your favourite concoctions more sustainable. Rounding up many a lemon, piece of fruit and even a few olives, they're turning yesterday's cocktail waste into today's hand washing liquid. Prepare to lather up with 42BELOW Recycled Cocktail Lemons Eco Soap, aka the world's first hand soap made from recycled cocktail fruit.

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Biodegradable edible Six-pack Rings

Posted by Earthr.org Content Team on 21 Aug, 2018

After seeing the effect plastic has on marine animals like birds and turtles, Saltwater Bakery — a small brewery in Delray Beach, Florida — teamed up with New York advertising agency We Believers to redesign their packaging to make it more environmentally friendly. What they came up with was a biodegradable version of the plastic rings made of the wheat and barley that's left over after brewing. They claim that it's the first 100 per cent biodegradable, compostable and edible packaging in the beer industry.

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United by Blue - Removing Ocean Trash for every product sold

Posted by Earthr.org Content Team on 21 Aug, 2018

For every product it sells, United by Blue, an outdoor apparel company, pledges to remove a pound of trash from the oceans and waterways. At the time of this writing, the company had removed 1,097,777 pounds of trash. To promote the spirit of community involvement among its employees, the company offers 20 hours paid time off for community service. 

Besides getting its own employees’ hands dirty, the company invites the public to join their cleanups. To further its environmental agenda, United by Blue holds its suppliers to specific environmental standards, preferring recycled and natural, organic materials. And 75 percent of its office supplies are made from recycled materials.

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Oil out of Plastic

Posted by Earthr.org Content Team on 21 Aug, 2018

A company called Recycling Technologies can melt down all plastic (not just bottle plastic) in large volumes. Once melted, the plastic is turned into oil called Plaxx. This new oil can then be used as a heavy fuel substitute and a raw material in polymer production. 

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PuraKai: Ocean-friendly Clothing

Posted by Earthr.org Content Team on 21 Aug, 2018

Started by a father-daughter duo in 2013, PuraKai Clothing is a U.S.-based organic cotton clothing brand. 

It manufactures eco-friendly clothing as well as high-performance surf craft, using organic, recycled and bio-based materials without the kinds of harmful additives that eventually end up in the ocean. The line of organic cotton clothing goes from “seed to shirt.”

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AWAKE Watches - Watches from Ocean Trash

Posted by Earthr.org Content Team on 21 Aug, 2018

AWAKE Watches is a startup founded by two French entrepreneurs, who have made a statement about their strong environmental values through their product: a stylish but also sustainable watch.

The watch's straps are made of recycled plastic, its case is built from recycled stainless steel, and it is powered by sunlight, eliminating the need for a mercury battery. A three-hour exposure to light gives the timepiece enough power to run for six months without recharging. The watch’s design was also inspired by the elements of nature.

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Bureo - Recycling discarded fishnets

Posted by Earthr.org Content Team on 21 Aug, 2018

Bureo, whose name means “the waves” in Chilean Spanish, is a startup that aims to reduce ocean pollution by recycling discarded fishnets to make a range of cool products, including skateboards and sunglasses. Through the Net Positiva program, the first-ever fishnet collection effort in Chile, 

Bureo provides local fishermen with environmentally safe fishnet disposal points. In return, it gets raw materials for making plastic pellets, to be used later in the production of durable quality products.

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Making denim from plastic

Posted by Earthr.org Content Team on 21 Aug, 2018

To reduce the amount of non-biodegradable waste floating in the oceans, G-Star Raw, together with Parley for the Oceans and Bionic, is making a unique contribution to the fashion industry. The companies have created the first denim collection -- Raw for the Oceans -- made from ocean plastic.

Parley sweeps the ocean for plastic and retrieves it for Bionic, which makes yarn out of it. Next, G-Star, through a sophisticated manufacturing process, turns the yarn into denim. The result is a product that looks and feels like regular denim, with the unique distinction of being born of the efforts to save the oceans.

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The Ocean Cleanup - Cleaning up the Great Pacific Garbage Patch

Posted by Earthr.org Content Team on 20 Aug, 2018

The system consists of a 600-meter-long floater that sits at the surface of the water and a tapered 3-meter-deep skirt attached below. The floater provides buoyancy to the system and prevents plastic from flowing over it, while the skirt stops debris from escaping underneath.

Both the plastic and system are being carried by the current. However, wind and waves propel only the system, as the floater sits just above the water surface, while the plastic is primarily just beneath it. The system thus moves faster than the plastic, allowing the plastic to be captured.

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Theme parks offer half-price entry in exchange for plastic bottles

Posted by Dharmesh Mehta on 31 Jul, 2018

In a tie-up between theme park operator Merlin and drinks giant Coca-Cola, a series of so-called “reverse vending machines” will be installed outside the entrances of Alton Towers, Thorpe Park, Chessington World of Adventures and Legoland.

In a bid to boost flagging recycling rates and tackle plastic litter, the machines will reward users depositing any 500ml plastic bottle with half-price discount vouchers which can be redeemed at all 30 Merlin attractions in the UK.

The initiative – which will run until mid-October – follows research by Coca-Cola which reveals that 64% of Britons would recycle more if they were rewarded instantly for their actions.

At present, just 43% of the 13bn plastic bottles sold each year in the UK are recycled, and 700,000 are littered every day. Pressure is growing on the government, retailers and consumers to increase rates of bottle recycling and cut marine pollution. In March, the environment secretary, Michael Gove, announced plans to launch a mandatory deposit system for bottles and cans in the UK, although details are still being worked out.

Conventional deposit return schemes – in operation in 38 countries – typically involve an upfront deposit which is refunded to consumers who return their bottles and cans. Fees vary depending on the size of the bottle or can and many increasingly use new “reverse vending machines” to automate the return.

“We want to reward people for doing the right thing by recycling their bottles and hope to encourage some people who wouldn’t otherwise have done so,” said Jon Woods, general manager of Coca-Cola UK & Ireland. “All of our bottles can be recycled and we want to get as many of them back as possible so they can be turned into new bottles and not end up as litter.”

Meanwhile, the Co-op – the first UK retailer to launch a deposit return scheme trial with reverse vending machines – is reporting positive feedback from thousands of visitors to major summer music festivals, with high take-up rates and reduced littering.

Through a link-up with organiser Festival Republic, the machines have been used at Co-op pop-up stores at Download and Latitude, with Reading and Leeds festivals to follow at the end of August. Users receive a voucher to spend, while the collected bottles go on to be recycled to create bottles for the Co-op's own brand water.

Frozen food giant Iceland and supermarket chain Morrisons have also launched small-scale trials of reverse vending machines.

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Plastic Bank stops ocean plastic while reducing poverty by turning waste into currency.

Posted by Kunal Nandwani on 29 May, 2018

By enabling the exchange of plastic for money, items or Blockchain secured digital tokens, it reveals the value in plastic. This empowers recycling ecosystems around the world and stops the flow of plastic into our oceans. All while helping people living in poverty build better futures.

How: By providing a consistent above-market rate for plastic waste, thus incentivizing its collection. Individuals who gather plastic can trade it for money, items or services.

It also provides the ability for local entrepreneurs to set up and operate a convenience store for the poor in which plastic is a currency. Plastic collected through The Plastic Bank is recycled and sold at a premium as Social Plastic®.

A ladder of opportunity is created for the world’s poor by providing access to income, goods and services and plastic is kept out of the ocean.

A lot of companies for example: Henkel, are already partnering with Plastic Bank in its multipurpose noble initiative, turning environmental challenges into life chances. Such a project can be scaled to specific areas in association with the creators or a similar model can help save the oceans of the planet.

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